Justdiggit: Using Natural Land Regeneration Techniques to Re-Green Our Planet and Reverse Climate Change

I was inspired to write this article after seeing a video about the incredible work Justdiggit is doing to help re-green the planet. Speaking in that video was Wessel van Eeden, the Global Marketing Director of Justdiggit, so I reached out to him and he enthusiastically suggested that we should have a call. 

After talking for some time about the state of our planet, the good things, the bad things, and how we can fix it, I could tell that Wessel has a very genuine passion for the great work Justdiggit is doing.

This article is based on what I learned from our call, with a great deal of other research involved as well! It’s important to state that Justdiggit is not paying me to write this article, I just think they’re a genuinely brilliant, planet-improving, inspirational organisation that deserves a place on A Wall of Hope.

All views are entirely my own, and all facts are entirely the facts! But that’s enough of my rumbling and rambling; it’s time to start digging! 

Digging Ourselves out of a Hole 

We’re in a bit of a hole aren’t we? I mean we’re not literally in a hole, unless the entire universe is some sort of bottomless black hole or something like that, but metaphorically, we’re in a hole. A great big climate crisis shaped hole. 

Our planet is getting hotter by the second, our deserts are expanding, crops are failing, millions of people may soon have to leave their homes due to extreme weather conditions. At times the situation can seem quite hopeless, but you know what? There is plenty of hope. There are so many effective solutions out there, and some of the best ones come straight from nature. 

The name ‘Justdiggit’ comes from the work they do in Kenya, where they work with locals to dig crescent-shaped holes or ‘bunds’ in the ground to help the soil absorb more rainwater and gain fertility. It’s pretty crazy really; just by digging holes in the ground we can bring a huge area of supposedly barren land completely back to life. 

By cleverly utilising things like rainwater and natural vegetation we can cool down the planet, bring barren land back to life, and rejuvenate impoverished communities in the process. One Amsterdam based organisation doing this right now is Justdiggit, and the work they’re doing is truly inspirational. 

Justdiggit works in areas with severely degraded land to bring the land back to life. They use a grassroots approach, working with local communities and empowering them to take ownership of the land regeneration projects and carry them forward. The techniques they use are simple but effective, and are strategically designed to not only improve the health of the land, but to cool down the regional climate as well. This has major benefits for the environment and biodiversity, as well as the economic and social wellbeing of the local communities. 

The name ‘Justdiggit’ comes from the work they do in Kenya, where they work with locals to dig crescent-shaped holes or ‘bunds’ in the ground to help the soil absorb more rainwater and gain fertility. You can see from the image below how effective this simple technique has been for regenerating the land. 

An example of the crescent-shaped bunds that are dug in the ground to help the soil absorb rainwater and become fertile.

It’s pretty crazy really; just by digging holes in the ground we can bring a huge area of supposedly barren land completely back to life. 

So maybe all we have to do to get out of this climate crisis shaped hole we’re in is just, well, dig? As you’ll see in this article, it’s not always as simple as that, but Justdiggit is very good at finding suitable solutions no matter what the situation. All in all, this Justdiggit bunch are some pretty wonderful folks, but where the heck did they come from? 

Justdiggit: Founded through a Shared Optimism 

Justdiggit was founded to show the world that we do have practical solutions to our greatest problems. 

The Justdiggit story began in 2009 when Dennis Karpes, social entrepreneur and co-founder of the international youth-empowering initiative Dance4Life, met the late Peter Westerveld, founder of the Westerveld Conservation Trust, and a man who dedicated his life to fighting the effects of climate change and desertification.

When Peter showed Dennis the positive results of his own landscape restoration projects, a shared shovel of hope and optimism was lifted, and Justdiggit was founded to show the world that we do have practical solutions to our greatest problems. 

Since then Jusdiggit has thrived. With a core team based in Amsterdam, they work with small local teams, local and international partners, and dedicated volunteers to create a major impact wherever they work. 

So far they have focused their efforts in Kenya and Tanzania, where they have managed to breathe (or dig) life into lifeless land, invigorate local communities, and foster a growing local knowledge of suitable land management techniques that will remain for year and years to come. 

Pretty incredible, awe-inspiring, hope-renewing, land-resurrecting, optimism-injecting, jaw-droppingly encouraging stuff! But how exactly do they do it? 

The co-founders of Justdiggit! Dennis Karpes on the left, Peter Westerveld on the right.

How is Justdiggit Helping to Reverse Climate Change? 

Justdiggit is in the business of solving problems, and right now they’re working to solve possibly the biggest problem of all; climate change. They’re doing this by going to areas where the land has dried up, and bringing the land back to life.

On a large enough scale the increase in vegetation that results from doing this will stimulate more rainfall, lower regional temperatures, reduce drought and reverse desertification, and eventually, begin to cool down the entire planet! Here’s a rundown of how they do it. 

The Problem – Wasted Rain! 

The rain comes and goes but the land can’t manage to take a drink!

In most areas with degraded land there is rain, usually concentrated in a few heavy downpour events, but the hard top layer of dried out soil causes most of the water to flow away. The heavy rain is unable to penetrate the surface of the land, and instead washes away the top layer of fertile soil, causing erosion, loss of soil fertility, and flooding downstream. 

When the land is too dried up, most of the rainwater is unable to penetrate the hard top layer of soil, and ends up washing away as surface runoff.

So the rain comes and goes but the land can’t manage to take a drink! Just imagine being really really thirsty, lying on a bench in 40˚c heat, with a big (reusable) bottle of fresh, cold delicious water next to you, but being too dehydrated to open your mouth and take a drink. Now that’s what it’s like for this degraded land. The bottle of water is there, but the land can’t take a drink. 

Luckily, Justdiggit knows how to help. 

The Solution – Working with Nature 

By using natural rainwater harvesting, soil conservation and re-greening techniques, Justdiggit is able to improve soil conditions and bring back vegetation to degraded landscapes. The specific way they do this depends on the area they’re working in, discussed below, but here’s a generalised run through of how they bring the land back to life! 

  1. Natural techniques suitable for the local area are used so the land can retain rainwater. This prevents erosion, and allows vegetation to grow. 
  2. The increase in vegetation is complemented with the planting of trees, and improved agriculture and agroforestry. This attracts all sorts of wonderful creatures to the area, and so, biodiversity increases. 
  3. As the plants and trees grow they bring more moisture to the air, which helps to create clouds and therefore, more rain. 
  4. Renewed root systems in the ground make the soil more porous, so the rain can infiltrate more easily. This causes vegetation to spread. 
  5. As the vegetation spreads, the whole cycle of land restoration continues. Soil quality in the wider area improves, which brings more vegetation, which brings more rain, which brings more vegetation, and suddenly the whole area is thriving with life. A beautiful, natural, sustainable cycle of habitat restoration, all brought about through a few simple interventions. Tremendous. 
  6. By doing this on a large enough scale Justdiggit creates what they call ‘hydrologic corridors’, which are large scale areas of restored land. Implemented in strategically chosen locations, these corridors can impact (and cool down) the regional climate. Now that’s pretty damn cool if you ask me! Literally. 

As the vegetation spreads, the whole cycle of land restoration continues. Soil quality in the wider area improves, which brings more vegetation, which brings more rain, which brings more vegetation, and suddenly the whole area is thriving with life.

And what might happen if we cool down loads and loads of regional climates across the world? And not just cool them down temporarily, but alter them in a way that they become self-cooling? Hmmmmm. Maybe we can cool down the entire planet? Bingo! That’s ultimately what Justdiggit is aiming to do, and they’re doing a pretty good job so far. 

Here’s a graphical representation of how a ‘Hydrologic Corridor’ can alter an area’s regional climate, reducing temperature and increasing moisture by restoring the water cycle.

But they’re not just bringing land back to life and cooling down the climate. Probably my favourite thing about what Justdiggit is doing is the way they work in partnership with local communities. They really listen to what people have to say, and that’s what makes the Justdiggit projects truly sustainable. 

A Bottom-Up Approach: Working with the Locals 

“If Justdiggit leaves now and don’t do anything, I can assure you that this is a concept that will be escalated further. It will be used further by the community because they believe in it, and it is within their thinking framework.”

“Justdiggit didn’t bring a solution, they came and asked what the problem was and intervened.” – Benson Leyian, general manager of the Amboseli Ecosystem Trust

Mr. Leyian was speaking in one of Justdiggit’s documentaries (more on those later) about one of their projects in Kenya, and it sums up the grassroots approach that Justdiggit takes. 

Before deciding which interventions to use in a particular area, Justdiggit works in close collaboration with local communities, and takes social conditions and land use into account as well as climate and soil conditions. 

The aim is to create sustainable solutions that bring social and economic benefits to the communities as well as environmental ones. This ensures that the communities will embrace the interventions in the long-term. 

Mr. Leyian continues – “If Justdiggit leaves now and don’t do anything, I can assure you that this is a concept that will be escalated further. It will be used further by the community because they believe in it, and it is within their thinking framework.”

Benson Leyian speaking in the Justdiggit documentary Rainmakers II: Seeds of Change

Now that sounds pretty sustainable to me! Justdiggit has even taken advantage of ancient local techniques in some of their interventions to bring locals on side, which is very interesting. Let’s have a look at some of the specific techniques they’re using in each of their project areas. 

Justdiggit Projects in Kenya 

By managing livestock and digging some holes in the ground, Justdiggit has already managed to regenerate thousands of hectares of beautiful Kenyan land.

At the Olgulului-Ololarashi group ranch in Kenya, home to a large community of Maasai pastoralists, the land has become severely degraded by drought and overgrazing. Together with the African Conservation Centre, the Amboseli Ecosystem Trust, and the local communities, Justdiggit has formed a programme to restore the degraded areas, and improve the livelihood of the local Maasai people. Here are some of the main techniques being used. 

Grazing Management (Olopololi’s)  

The use of Olopololi plots is an ancient grazing technique used by the Maasai people in the past. The technique involved fencing off areas of fresh grass, which were used as grazing sites for calves and weaker cattle that could not make the long nomadic journeys. (The Maasai people used to be nomads!) In the years since the Maasai people have settled in one spot, this technique was forgotten. 

Bringing old traditions back to life to create a better future, Justdiggit has convinced the Maasai people that embracing this technique again can help them restore their degraded land. Olopololi plots have been created and marked with large white poles, and cattle grazing is only permitted in these areas during specific periods. Land restorations efforts are then implemented in these areas, with the lack of grazing giving vegetation the chance to regenerate. 

An example of how effective the Olopololi plots can be. The greener area to the left is within the Olopololi area, with the barren land to the right outside the protected area.

Through training and education, Justdiggit has also helped the locals set up grazing committees, so they can set up a grazing management plan together, and monitor the areas so the vegetation has a chance to grow back. 

Water Bunds 

To give the vegetation and even better chance of growing back, a series of half-moon shaped pits have been dug in the ground which capture rainwater and prevent loss of soil fertility and erosion. The increased soil moisture resulting from this allows vegetation to naturally recover. 

Here you can see the vegetation growing back in the green crescent shaped where the ‘bunds‘ have been dug.

So amazingly, just by managing livestock and digging some holes in the ground, Justdiggit has already managed to regenerate thousands of hectares of beautiful Kenyan land. A wonderful achievement. 

To learn about all the other techniques Justdiggit is using to bring Kenyan land back to life, you can go here! But what about Tanzania? 

Justdiggit Projects in Tanzania 

Below the earth’s surface, the root systems of many living tree stumps still reach the fertile part of the soil. In Tanzania, there are millions of these living tree stumps, and they all have the potential to re-grow into living trees. If they are managed properly! 

In the Dodoma region of Tanzania local communities have survived for years in the face of increasing desertification, land degradation and climate change, but in some areas lately, it has become too extreme. In partnership with the LEAD Foundation, MetaMeta, and the local communities, Justdiggit has come up with a set of interventions to help the situation, and they’re quite different to the ones being used in Kenya! Here’s some of the main ones. 

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (Kisiki Hai) 

Below the earth’s surface, the root systems of many living tree stumps still reach the fertile part of the soil. In Tanzania, there are millions of these living tree stumps, and they all have the potential to re-grow into living trees. If they are managed properly! 

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration, known as ‘Kisiki Hai’ in Tanzania which means ‘living stump’, is a tree management technique originally developed in Niger. (With an incredible amount of success) It involves carefully managing these living tree stumps so they grow back into full-sized trees. Once they grow back, these trees help to prevent soil erosion and increase soil fertility, boosting the natural re-greening of the degraded landscape. They also provide food, fuel, and firewood for local communities. 

Two ladies treating a tree using the ‘Kisiki Hai’ method in Tanzania.

Collaborating with the LEAD Foundation, Justdiggit is training locals to become ‘Kisiki Hai Champions.’ Once trained in the green arts of Kisiki Hai, these ‘facilitators’ then train other farmers about how to regrow trees on their farmlands, who in turn train even more farmers, creating a beautiful green wave where knowledge spreads trees and trees spread life and the whole wider area becomes a more fertile place as a result. What a beautiful way to regreen the land. 

Fanya Juu and Fanya Chini 

After mastering Kisiki Hai (I really love these Tanzanian words) farmers can learn about other methods such as Fanya Juu and Fanya Chini. These techniques involve digging different shaped contours on the farm to maximise the effectiveness of the rainwater. You can learn the details of these methods here

An example of Fanya Juu and Fanya Chini in action!

And speaking of details, if you’d like to learn more about other land regeneration methods being used in Tanzania, you can do that here! 

So that was just a little taste of what Justdiggit is doing in Kenya and Tanzania. I reckon it’s pretty groovy how they tailor their interventions to work with the land and also with the local communities. The idea is to create techniques that can be adapted and applied anywhere in the world, and by doing that we can begin to reverse the global issue of climate change. 

I suppose that’s the obvious benefit of doing this; reversing climate change. But what are the other main benefits?  

Justdiggit Projects: What are the Main Benefits? 

The work Justdiggit is doing doesn’t just come from an obsession with the colour green. I mean obviously green is a beautiful colour, and I’m sure the folks at Justdiggit absolutely love green, and want to see as much of it as possible, everywhere! But there are plenty of real-life benefits that come from these projects, for those of us who happen to live on the land being restored, and for those of us who don’t. 

Helping Local Communities Thrive 

Well managed land restoration projects provide many economic and social benefits for the local communities involved. The projects create employment and increased income, which can lead to improved health and education in the area. 

In this Justdiggit documentary a mother in Kenya talks about how money from the Justdiggit project has allowed her to take her children to school for the first time, and to feed them well. It’s hard to imagine a more significant, transformative social improvement within a community than the possibility of having healthier, better-educated children. A really incredible result! 

Empowerment 

And when the projects have been completed, the farmers retain the knowledge of how to manage the land. The restored land provides resources for the community like fruits, firewood, animal feed, and seeds etc. These resources can be used, traded and sold, ensuring the community remains financially independent moving forward, and continuing the trend of improved health and education. 

When the projects have been completed, the farmers retain the knowledge of how to manage the land.

So much like the way regenerated land is empowered with the ability to increase rainfall and maintain its regenerated state, the rejuvenated local communities are empowered with the knowledge and resources to remain rejuvenated. Sustainability at it’s finest! 

A Flourishing Local Climate 

As we’ve already discussed, regenerating degraded land improves the health of the soil and brings back vegetation. Combined with the planting of trees this increases the moisture in the air, improves biodiversity, and increases rainfall in the area. The increased rainfall brings more vegetation, and eventually the whole process has a cooling effect on the regional climate. Basically, bring the land back to life, and soon, the whole area will thrive! 

A clear example of how Justdiggit’s work regenerates the local climate. These photos were taken of the same area in Kenya. The first photo is from June 2016, and the second from May 2018. In less than two years the entire area has been brought back to life; amazing stuff!

A Cooler Global Climate 

Regenerate enough land around the world, cool down enough regional climates, and we might have a shot at cooling down the planet.

Now for all you folks sitting at home with your water on tap and your refrigerated food and your air conditioning, you may not worry too much about your luscious front lawn becoming a desert right now, but unfortunately, with a planet getting hotter by the day, that’s eventually the way it’s going. 

Land regeneration projects like the ones Justdiggit is working on have the potential to stop that from happening. Regenerate enough land around the world, cool down enough regional climates, and we might have a shot at cooling down the planet. (And saving your luscious front lawn!) (You probably live in the city don’t you?) (Don’t we all?) (Sigh)

But to make it work, people have to know about the magic of land regeneration! Luckily, Justdiggit are pretty savvy with the communication side of things as well! 

Education Should Never Stay in Your Pocket: Spreading the Word about Land Regeneration 

“Education should never stay in your pocket, you have to share it with others.” – Mzee Agustino Sagalagwe, Kisiki Hai Champion Farmer from Lupeta village in Tanzania 

This guy’s a bit of a hero!

Another great quote from a Justdiggit documentary, Mr. Sagalagwe imparted this beautiful wisdom while teaching a young farmer about the Kisiki Hai technique, encouraging him to pass on the knowledge to others as well. 

This spreading of knowledge to other farmers is absolutely essential if these techniques are to be a success, because if nobody knows about them, what use are they at all? It’s also important for people around the world to know about the potential of land regeneration for cooling down the planet, so they can show their support for these projects through donations and by volunteering. 

Justdiggit seems to realise this need to spread the word, both to the farmers and to the wider world, and they’ve come up with some really innovative ways of doing it. 

The Video Caravan 

We’ve already discussed how Justdiggit is training local farmers, and encouraging them to pass on the knowledge to other farmers, and this word-of-mouth knowledge transfer is a great way to spread the word. But they go a step further with ‘The Video Caravan’, which uses the art of cinema to spread knowledge to local communities in Kenya and Tanzania.

By showing interviews with local farmers who have already had success using the land regeneration techniques, the documentaries offer convincing evidence to the folks watching that the techniques are worth implementing. 

As I’ve mentioned a few times in this article already, Justdiggit makes some pretty nifty videos and documentaries about the work they’re doing. These documentaries are centred entirely around the local farmers and communities in Kenya and Tanzania, and they highlight the environmental issues facing these communities, and discuss potential solutions like the “Kisiki Hai’ technique.

Justdiggit then works with local partners to drive around to different villages in ‘The Video Caravan’, and play the documentaries for the locals in an outdoor cinema kind of set up. They tend to create a big carnival kind of atmosphere for these events with dancing and singing and dude’s on microphones to maximise the effect, and it definitely seems to get people interested! 

An outdoor showing of a Justdiggit documentary in Tanzania

By showing interviews with local farmers who have already had success using the land regeneration techniques, the documentaries offer convincing evidence to the folks watching that the techniques are worth implementing. 

It’s a really nice, creative way to spread the word and convince local farmers to adopt the new techniques. 

Justdiggit College 

Educating future generations about the importance of things like land regeneration is vitally important. It might inspire so many young people to get involved in these projects from an early age, and that can only be a good thing for the future health of our planet! Justdiggit College aims to do just that.

The programme covers topics like soil, water, biodiversity, CO2, and Justdiggit, and can be adapted by teachers to suit their class’s needs. 

Justdiggit College is an education programme that primary school teachers in the Netherlands can access for free and incorporate into their teaching curriculums. The programme covers topics like soil, water, biodiversity, CO2, and Justdiggit, and can be adapted by teachers to suit their class’s needs. 

Spreading that open-source environmental knowledge far and wide to the bright minds of tomorrow! Very encouraging indeed. 

The Raindance Project 

What if we could use music to raise awareness about issues like land degradation and the power of re-greening projects to reverse climate change? Wouldn’t that just be extra beautiful? Music brings people together as they say. 

Well that’s exactly what Jusdiggit is aiming to do with The Raindance Project. This is a series of worldwide musical events aimed at showcasing the potential of landscape restoration to the world. They have already held three simultaneous events in 2019, which took place in Kenya, Tanzania, and the Netherlands. The events were connected with a live satellite connection, to remind people that we are all in this together! 

The Raindance Project event in Voldelpark, Amsterdam last summer. This event took place simultaneously with two other events in Kenya and Tanzania, and the events were connected with a big screen. What an absolutely fantastic initiative.

From 2020, similar simultaneous events will be held across more and more countries every two years, with the eventual aim of holding the events all around the world. This really is an absolutely astonishing initiative to get the word out there about the power of re-greening, and as the events become more widely known, so will the potential of landscape restoration. 

The Raindance Project is a series of worldwide musical events aimed at showcasing the potential of landscape restoration to the world.

I see no reason whatsoever why all the most popular musicians in the world today shouldn’t drop their tools and offer to perform at these events for free. It makes so much sense! So if you happen to know any famous musicians, ring them right now and let them know, it’s time to make it rain! 

Marketing Campaigns 

‘Dig Green Cool’, as simple as that. This is just one example of Justdiggit’s effective marketing strategy.

Justdiggit also reaches millions of people every day with their super slick, always positive marketing campaigns on TV, cinema, radio, online and on billboards and stuff. I’m not going to go into detail on these because I’d be here all day! But they’re very entertaining, well thought out campaigns and you can check them out here if you’d like. 

So clearly, Justdiggit knows a thing or two about spreading the good word, but they’re not the only ones! They’ve got plenty of planet-loving partners and ambassadors who share their mission for a greener world. 

Justdiggit Partnerships 

Justdiggit has loads of partners. Loads and loads of fantastic partners all around the planet who are all working to make the world a better place. If you want to learn more about all of them, you can find a list here! But for now, here’s a quick look at some of the main ones. 

Timberland 

Before I even knew about Justdiggit, I had heard the news that Timberland plans to plant 50 million trees around the world over the next five years, a fabulous initiative. It was only later I found out that 10 million of those trees will be in partnership with Justdiggit in Tanzania. And yes, you guessed it! Instead of planting new trees Justdiggit will work with Timberland and local farmers to restore existing tree stumps using the Kisiki Hai method. 10 million tree stumps! There’s just no getting away from the magic of Kisiki Hai it seems! 

Timberland plans to plant 50 million trees around the world over the next five years

It also seems that Timberland is a genuine company that takes environmental sustainability very seriously, and it’s great to see such a big brand teaming up with planet-altering initiatives like Justdiggit. 

Green Up to Cool Down 

The Green up to Cool Down movement is a ‘moonshot endeavour to reverse climate change.’ The aim is to unite all the worlds largest NGOs, corporates, organisations, and key global stakeholders behind the common goal of using nature-based solutions to save our planet. 

Great organisations like Concern Worldwide, Oxfam, Conservation International, and of course Justdiggit and many many more have already signed up, and hopefully it’s the start of something really special. If all these organisations are even half as committed to re-greening the planet as Justdiggit is, we’re in with a real shot. 

These incredible organisations have already committed to The Green up to Cool Down Movement.

UN Environment 

The United Nations Environment Programme is the leading global environmental authority within the United Nations system. With the UN recently declaring 2021-2030 as the ‘decade of ecosystem restoration,’ it makes sense that they have partnered with Justdiggit. Together, Justdiggit and UN Environment will work to launch a ‘worldwide re-green revolution.’ Well, there’s only one thing I say to that; Viva La Revolución!

Together with all these wonderful partners, I reckon Justdiggit is going to be part of something big. Something really big. Something ‘save the whole wide wonderful world’ big! 

The future looks bright. The future looks luscious. The future looks green! But what kind of success have they had so far?  

Success so Far 

So far, Justdiggit has focused efforts in Kenya and Tanzania, and they have made plenty of progress in both locations!

In Kenya:

  • 123,130 bunds (crescent shaped holes in the ground that facilitate absorption of rainwater) have already been dug, re-greening over 2000 hectares of land in total. As you can see from the image below, the lasting regeneration of the local habitat is quite astonishing.

In Tanzania:

  • 5,143 bunds have been dug.
  • 145,339 farmers were practicing Kisiki Hai in 2019.
  • 279,188 farmers were trained by champion farmers in 2019.
  • 195 champion farmers are currently practicing Fanya Juu/Chini.
  • Stage three of ‘the video caravan’ reached 136,865 people in 247 villages.
  • 2,392,509 trees were protected using Kisiki Hai in 2019.
Here, in Kenya, you can see how digging the bunds helps bring back vegetation, which in turn spreads even more vegetation, which keeps the land healthy and green even when the dry season comes back. The results in such a short space of time, simply from digging some holes in the ground, really are incredible.

These are pretty astonishing numbers, and incredibly encouraging stuff! You can see from the image above the effect this work is having on the land in Kenya, and just imagine the future benefits that will come from all those farmers in Tanzania teaching, learning and practicing these land regeneration techniques.

2,392,509 trees were protected using Kisiki Hai in 2019

Millions of trees have been protected in one single year, and thousands of hectares of land regenerated, and they’ve barely even started. It’s incredible to think what might be achieved in the future. Well. Speaking of the future!

To a Greener Future 

The potential exists to re-green our planet on a scale large enough to reverse the effects of climate change globally. All we have to do, is act. 

With such major success stories in Kenya and Tanzania, there is no reason why Justdiggit’s methods can’t be applied anywhere in the world. Morocco, Burkina Faso, Benin and Ethiopia have already expressed interest in these programs on a government level. 

Globally, roughly 2 Billion hectares of our planet’s degraded soil is restorable. This amounts to an area spanning twice the size of Europe. So the potential exists to re-green our planet on a scale large enough to reverse the effects of climate change globally. All we have to do, is act. 

The World Resources Institute has identified 2 billion hectares of degraded land that offer opportunities for restoration. That’s a whoooooole lot of land!

With their easy to implement, grassroots restoration projects on the ground, incredible communications campaigns and events all around the world, and their education programs in the classroom, Justdiggit is doing everything they can to create a future where the earth is green and the climate is friendly. I’m sure that’s a future we all want to see become a reality. 

And it turns out, we can all help make it happen! 

How We All Can Help 

There are many ways that we can help spread this message of hope and rejuvenation.

We all have a role to play if we want to make the world green again. We can help spread the word about wonderful initiatives like Justdiggit simply by telling people about them. We can share the stories on social media, talk to our friends about land restoration, shout ‘Kisiki Hai’ through a megaphone repeatedly on a crowded street! There are many ways that we can help spread this message of hope and rejuvenation. 

To help Justdiggit specifically you can make a financial donation here, or you can register on their ‘re-greening platform’. This platform allows people to directly support African farmers in re-greening their land by buying ‘bunds.’ 

The Justdiggit Re-Greening platform connects people around the world with farmers in Africa and allows them to pledge financial support to farmers by purchasing the ‘bunds’ they dig.

Remember those ‘bunds’ we talked about earlier? The little crescent-shaped holes being dug in the ground that allow the soil to absorb moisture? Well on this platform you can create an account, choose the number of bunds you want to have dug, and basically invest in cooling down the planet and supporting local farmers in Africa. The farmers are paid per bund via the app, and you even receive a photo of the final result. An absolutely brilliant way of using technology to bring people together in the fight against climate change. We can all do our part. 

But after all of this, the question still stands. Can we get ourselves out of this climate crisis shaped hole we’re in by just, digging? 

Combined with all the other great work Justdiggit and similar organisations are doing around the world, and with the help of people like you and me, the answer to that question is, a regenerative, yes.

We can. 

About the Author

Adam Millett is a freelance writer for hire who specialises in sustainability and environmental issues. He believes the economy should be circular, businesses should make the world a better place, and that effective content is the best way to spread the word about sustainability. Visit his website at wordchameleon.com if you want to bring your vision of sustainability to life.

4 Comments on “Justdiggit: Using Natural Land Regeneration Techniques to Re-Green Our Planet and Reverse Climate Change

  1. Great article! This the right time to restore the green environment we had.People, Animals and crops themselves are starving due to climate change.It the right time to arise and make change.
    How can I join the organization?Am in Kenya

    Like

    • Hey Denis, thank you so much for the comment and I’m delighted you enjoyed the article! Apologies for the delay in replying.

      Yes it’s absolutely the correct time to act on climate change! Unfortunately I don’t actually work for Justdiggit and am not sure how exactly you can join, but if you contact them through the link below I’m sure they will let you know how! They are all very friendly folks!

      https://justdiggit.org/contact/

      It would be great to get involved, I wish you the best of luck!

      Like

  2. Really a wonderful approach ! Suitable for dry regions across the world.

    Like

    • It really is fantastic. Justdiggit is doing some planet-altering work!

      Like

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